Home » Measuring cognitive and psychological engagement in middle school students. by Sandra Huber Leonard
Measuring cognitive and psychological engagement in middle school students. Sandra Huber Leonard

Measuring cognitive and psychological engagement in middle school students.

Sandra Huber Leonard

Published
ISBN : 9781109069785
NOOKstudy eTextbook
76 pages
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 About the Book 

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between cognitive and psychological engagement and math and reading achievement in middle school students. A secondary purpose was to investigate the relationship between cognitive engagementMoreThe purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between cognitive and psychological engagement and math and reading achievement in middle school students. A secondary purpose was to investigate the relationship between cognitive engagement and math and reading achievement based on gender, grade level, and free and reduced lunch status.-A self-report survey instrument called the Student Engagement Instrument (SEI) was administered by the Sioux Falls School District 49-5 to 729 middle school students. The data for math and reading achievement were taken from the South Dakota Test of Educational Progress for Mathematics (DSTEP Math) and Reading (DSTEP Reading) that was administered to all sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students.-Information from the survey was extracted using inferential statistical analyses, including the Pearson product-moment correlation, t test, and the one-way ANOVA to analyze the strength and direction of the relationships identified in the research questions.-Findings from the study indicated that there was a significant relationship found between cognitive and psychological engagement and reading and math achievement. Cognitive engagement dropped significantly between grades six and eight, but no differences in cognitive engagement were found between grades six and seven or between grades seven and eight. Psychological engagement dropped significantly between grades six and seven and between grades six and eight, but not between grades seven and eight. Females showed significant positive correlation between cognitive and psychological engagement and math and reading achievement. Males did not show a significant correlation between cognitive and psychological engagement and math achievement and reading achievement. No significant correlations were found between cognitive and psychological engagement and math and reading achievement based on free or reduced lunch status.